Most personnel from the Royal New Zealand Army Medical Corps served with the New Zealand Services Medical Team (NZSMT) or served as medics for 161 Bty[67] and the New Zealand infantry companies, or were otherwise stationed at the New Zealand V Force Headquarters in Saigon and at 1 ALSG. The team helped train South Vietnamese platoon commanders in weapons and tactics. The end of this conflict coincided with a significant change in New Zealand’s approach to regional security. In December a second Victor Company was deployed to Vietnam and was joined by Whisky Company in December, both from the 1st Battalion. In June 1969 the team moved to the new 100-bed Bong Son Impact Hospital. In 2006, the New Zealand government signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Vietnam veterans and their families. Hereafter the tour of duty for all RNZIR companies was extended to twelve months. Made up of members from various New Zealand branches of service including two members from RNZN, the team helped train Khmer National Armed Forces (FANK) personnel in weapons and tactics and first aid. In terms of national security, our combat involvement represented the culmination of a line of official thinking based on the ANZUS alliance, the perceived dangers of Asian communism, and the commitment to forward defence in South-East Asia. )[43] Both New Zealand Army training teams consisted mainly of RNZIR personnel. Subsequently, a few served with the second of the two New Zealand training teams deployed to Vietnam after combat troops withdrew in 1971. The Troop was attached to the Australian SAS Squadron at Nui Dat and carried out long-range reconnaissance and the ambushing of enemy supply routes, mounting 155 patrols over three tours until being withdrawn in February 1971, with the loss of one member. The New Zealand headquarters established in Saigon in 1964 was renamed "Headquarters Vietnam Force" (HQ V Force) on 2 July 1965. New Zealand casualties during the Vietnam War were: RNZE: 2, RNZA: 5, RNZIR: 27, RNZAF: 1, NZSAS: 1, RNZAMC: 1 (for a total of 37) and 187 wounded. While National continued to accept the need for 'forward defence' and regional alliances, Labour leaders advocated new thinking in foreign policy to allow New Zealand to follow a more independent course in world affairs. The new "ANZAC Battalion" was the only Australian battalion to have five rifle companies. 'Mobilisations' in the early 1970s saw thousands in major centres march in protest against the war. The discovery of the hospital would prove to be a major defeat for the Communist forces in the area. While Prime Minister Holyoake and his government had their own misgivings about the viability of the war, they were consistent in their public belief that they were maintaining both New Zealand's foreign policy principles and treaty-bound obligations. The Battery left Vietnam in May 1971 after providing virtually continuous fire support usually in support of Australian and New Zealand infantry units for six years, with over 750 men having served with the Battery with a loss of five casualties during the period of its deployment. The Vietnam War. Can you tell us more about the information on this page? [58], When 161 Battery, RNZA arrived in Vietnam in 1965 a detachment of engineers from the Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers formed the Logistic Support Element (LSE), to service the battery. New Zealand society was changed politically as a direct consequence of the anti-Vietnam War movement through its transformation of the Labour Party and change in foreign policy. The conflict and the anti-war movement ushered in a new era of debate about New Zealand's place in the world. All non-text content is subject to specific conditions. Street marches against the war occurred as early as 1964, but its escalation and mounting costs increased opposition. A plaque and memorial to Sgt Watt is on display at the Ohakea Base Medical flight, and there is also the "Gordon Watt Memorial Award" for the RNZAF’s top medic award, named in his honour. The MoU included a trust to support veterans’ children, a national reunion and official ‘welcome home’ parade named Tribute 08, and a formal apology for successive governments’ failure to address veterans’ concerns. These programs were known as "Pacification" and "Vietnamization" respectively as part of the "Winning Hearts And Minds" strategy being undertaken by the Americans. [49], Each time New Zealand military contribution to South Vietnam increased, a work party of the Corps of Royal New Zealand Engineers was sent to assist in preparing the site for the new arrivals. )[64], Two RNZAC pilots served with the Australian 161st (Independent) Reconnaissance Flight.[65][66]. Prime Minister Keith Holyoake decided to keep New Zealand involvement in Vietnam at the minimum level deemed necessary to meet allied expectations. [32][33], At the end of April 1970, a new 2 RAR from Australia and new Victor Company from Singapore arrived and on 15 May, Whisky 3 (now six months into their tour) and Victor 5 merged with 2 RAR to became for the second time 2 RAR/NZ (ANZAC). All New Zealand troops in Vietnam were volunteer regular personnel, so the protest movement did not have an anti-conscription edge, as it did in Australia and the United States. [69] The last commander of 1NZATTV (5 Dec 1972 – 13 Dec 1972), Major TD Macfarlane, was from RNZSigs. Few New Zealanders waved placards in the streets in 1965, but by the end of the decade thousands were marching against the war. From 1960, insurgents from the communist-dominated National Liberation Front – dubbed ‘Viet Cong’ in the south – fought a guerrilla campaign against a South Vietnamese regime that was now led by Ngo Dinh Diem. [20][21] On 8 November 1968 the first Whisky Company left Vietnam and was replaced by a second Whisky Company. "[28], As with other infantry companies of the Australian battalions, the New Zealand infantry companies too sometimes conducted independent operations or were temporarily put under the operational control of 1 ATF directly or under other Australian Battalions or units, and conducted operations with them, e.g Whisky 3 Company's mortar section conducted numerous independent operations with 3rd Cavalry Regiment in 1970, and the Company itself spent some time on Long Sơn Island directly under 1 ATF Command, and later under 8 RAR for some months, also in 1970. One focus of protest was the Vietnam War. These RNZE Detachments helped set up the NZ artillery battery when it moved to Nui Dat in September 1966 and again for Victor One Company RNZIR from early November to December 1967. Police leading away an anti-Vietnam War protester, 1971 (NZHerald/newspix.co.nz) Anti-war protesters disrupted a civic reception in Auckland for New Zealand soldiers returning from the Vietnam War.. On the same day of their arrival, a small headquarters unit established in Saigon. RNZEME personnel who had been in the LSE were taken for the most part into the Light Aid Detachment (LAD) of the Australian Artillery Field Regiment which 161 Bty was integrated with.[59]. This topic covers the anti-war protests, defence forces, action in Vietnam, apology from the Crown, compensation for veterans and refugees from Vietnam. With the battalion's tour cut short, Victor 6's last operation was one of protecting the activities of 1 ATF's withdrawal from South Vietnam. [52] Several RNZE personnel also served in these capacities with the NZSAS. For a growing number of New Zealanders, their country's participation in the conflict triggered a re-examination of its foreign policy and identity. As the training teams began their work, New Zealand progressively withdrew its combat forces, in line with reductions in American strength in Vietnam. [81] This is the first Australian Unit Citation for Gallantry offered to a New Zealand military unit.[82]. We were the first mass movement against a war in American … 1969: Flour bombs, paint and eggs thrown in protest over a visit of a high-ranking United States politician. 9 Squadron RAAF flying Bell UH-1 Huey helicopters which was based in Vung Tau.[45]. Holyoake was reluctant to commit troops and was drawn into the Vietnam War due to the pressure from America to uphold the ANZUS and SEATO treaty’s, which had been signed in 1951 and 1954. The anti-Vietnam War protests are often regarded as the beginning of the ANZUS alliance breakdown between New Zealand and the United States. The Vietnam experience was also important as a test of the country's relationship with the United States. Captain. Tell me more... 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New Zealand's military presence in South Vietnam was also increased in April 1967 with the arrival of the 1st New Zealand Services Medical Team, a 19-strong detachment consisting of medical personnel from the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Royal New Zealand Navy and Royal New Zealand Army Medical Corps under the US Military Public Health Assistance Programme (MILPHAP). [51], Sappers from the Royal New Zealand Engineers accompanied the RNZIR infantry patrols as Assault pioneers to assist with mine clearing and Combat engineering tasks. Two civilians serving with the surgical and Red Cross teams also lost their lives. For those who served in Vietnam, the war left a searing legacy. By then, a total of 3,890 New Zealand military personnel, all volunteers, had served in Vietnam from June 1964 to December 1972. With substantial forces stationed in Malaysia (in Confrontation with Indonesia from 1963), New Zealand had few military resources to spare for Vietnam without introducing conscription. Not all comments posted. From 1961, New Zealand came under pressure from the United States of America to contribute military and economic assistance to South Vietnam, but refused. The protests mark a split in foreign policies between the two major political parties of Labour and National. April 1963: NZ civilian surgical team arrives in VietnamJune 1964: NEWZAD arrives in VietnamJuly 1965: NEWZAD withdrawn; 161 Battery RNZA arrives in VietnamJune 1966: 161 Bty comes under operational control of 1ATF at Nui Dat, Phuoc Tuy provinceAugust 1966: 161 Bty involved in the Battle of Long TanApril 1967: NZSMT arrives in VietnamMay 1967: V Company 1RNZIR arrives in VietnamNovember 1967: V Coy replaced by V2 CoyDecember 1967: W Company 1RNZIR arrives in VietnamMarch 1968: NZ infantry companies integrate with 2RAR to form 2RAR/NZ (Anzac) Battalion at Nui Dat, Phuoc Tuy provinceMay 1968: V2 Coy replaced by V3 CoyNovember 1968: W Coy replaced by W2 CoyMay 1969: V3 Coy replaced by V4 CoyNovember 1969: W2 Coy replaced by W3 CoyMay 1970: V4 Coy replaced by V5 CoyNovember 1970: W3 Coy withdrawn from VietnamJanuary 1971: 1NZATTV arrives in VietnamMay 1971: 161 Bty withdrawn from Vietnam; V5 Coy replaced by V6 CoyDecember 1971: NZSMT and V6 Coy withdrawn from VietnamMarch 1972: 2NZATTV arrives in VietnamDecember 1972: Training teams withdrawn from VietnamMarch 1975: NZ civilian surgical team withdrawn from VietnamApril 1975: NZ Ambassador evacuated from Saigon; last RNZAF flight out of Vietnam, See detailed timeline (VietnamWar.govt.nz). By then, more than 3000 military personnel had served with New Zealand’s Vietnam (V) Force in Vietnam. 40 Squadron RNZAF providing troop transport for New Zealand, Australian and some American troops, and No. In May 1967, a 182-man rifle company, (Victor One Company) was deployed to Vietnam from the 1st Battalion of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment in Malaysia. Thousands rallied against the war in notable public actions between 1967 and 1971. New Zealand's involvement in the Vietnam War was highly controversial, sparking widespread protest at home from anti-Vietnam War movements modelled on their American counterparts. [3], Under continuing American pressure, the government agreed during 1963 to provide a small non-combatant military force, but the deteriorating political situation in Saigon led to delays. Ian McGibbon - The Vietnam War: NZ's Story. The MoU also makes available various forms of support, to both New Zealand Vietnam Veterans and their families. Private civilian funding was also donated for 80 Vietnamese students to take scholarships in New Zealand. The team assisted an American training team in Chi Lang[disambiguation needed] to train South Vietnamese platoon commanders in weapons and tactics. The 2IC was filled by RNZIR Officer, Major Robert Ian Thorpe.[17][18]. 3 Squadron RNZAF served with No. The New Zealand publics’ opinion was polarized due to New Zealand’s involvement in the war, and public debate was generated over New Zealand’s foreign policy in particular how it relied on an alliance-based security. Protest movements in New Zealand against the Vietnam War divided society between those who were in support of New Zealand’s involvement and those who thought New Zealand had no place in the war. New Zealand service personnel and civilian volunteers were in the jungles, skies, hospital wards, training camps, ... On operations. One RNZAF member of the NZSMT, Sgt Gordon Watt, was killed by a booby trap in 1970, the RNZAF's only casualty of the war. Another source of bitterness has been the sense that, unlike Second World War veterans, they did not receive adequate recognition for their professional service in a demanding theatre of operations. [13], In November 1968, New Zealand's contribution to the 1st Australian Task Force was increased by the deployment of 4 Troop, New Zealand Special Air Service, comprising an officer and 25 other ranks. This may have been due to protests in New Zealand. New Zealanders in South-East Asia film (1965). Although New Zealand's involvement in the war was very limited compared to the contributions of some of its allies, it still triggered a large anti-Vietnam War movement at home. Even so, there was a vocal and well-organised anti-war movement in New Zealand. Jan 20, 2019 - Explore Larry Hellie's board "Vietnam Protests", followed by 140 people on Pinterest. 11 (some sources say 10) RNZIR personnel served as detachments to the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam which operated in Vietnam from 1962–1972. The New Zealanders relieved a United States Army medical team at Bong Son in Bình Định Province. [1] However, at that time, aircraft were tasked to deliver supplies to Da Nang on the way from RAF Changi to Hong Kong from time to time. New Zealand's road to Vietnam. America had been through nearly twenty years of the Cold War and they were … The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly. Both companies served in the 1st Australian Task Force in Nui Dat, Phuoc Tuy Province. [56][57], Additionally, Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Charles Fenton RNZE, was administratively in charge of all New Zealand forces in Vietnam, at the New Zealand Headquarters in Saigon (V Force HQ) from 25 July 1968 to 30 July 1970. As that conflict escalated, the protests grew in strength, and some turned violent. In May 1968 Victor 2 was replaced by Victor 3. Additionally, RNZIR personnel served in administrative roles at the New Zealand HQ V Force in Saigon,[41] in support and logistic roles within the ANZAC Battalions at Nui Dat,[42] and in the 1st Australian Logistics Support Group (1 ALSG. Following the French withdrawal and the Geneva conference’s ‘temporary’ division of Vietnam at the 17th Parallel, it became a founding member of the South-East Asia Treaty Organisation (SEATO), a regional alliance against the spread of communism sponsored by the British and (especially) the Americans. One of the first acts of Prime Minister Norman Kirk's Labour Party government (elected in December 1972) was to withdraw both training teams and the New Zealand headquarters in Saigon. 1 ATF would be increasingly called upon to provide support to a number of civil community reconstruction projects and assist in the training of South Vietnamese forces. Some RNZEME personnel served in the RNZIR rifle companies, the ANZAC Battalions (Command & Support), as well as at the New Zealand V Force HQ in Saigon. New Zealand's initial response was carefully considered and characterised by Prime Minister Keith Holyoake's cautiousness towards the entire Vietnam question. In December 1972, Norman Kirk’s newly elected Labour government withdrew both training teams. Lieutenant Colonel Royal NZ Engineers Headquarters NZ V Force", "United States Bronze Star with V Device Brian David Chippindale 822606. Captain Royal NZ Armoured Corps Attached 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, US Army", "Capt Edwin Allerton Donald Brooker | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/sites/default/files/documents/honours-awards/flanagan-dfc.pdf, https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/sites/default/files/documents/honours-awards/benyon-bem.pdf, "Mention in Despatches (m.i.d.) 1 NZATTV was made up of advisors from all branches of service, a number of whom had served in the RNZIR companies and in other New Zealand branches of service. [11] Overall there were 98 personnel involved over the four-and-a-half years of the Team’s deployment: 47 from the Army, 27 from the Air Force and 24 from the Navy. The government wanted to maintain solidarity with the United States, but was unsure about the likely outcome of external military intervention in Vietnam. [22] The battalion 2IC was RNZIR officer Major Neville Alan Wallace. Anti-war protesters disrupted a civic reception in Auckland for New Zealand soldiers returning from the Vietnam War. New Zealand's Vietnam War. New techniques. During the first Indo-China War (1946-1954) between the communist-dominated Viet Minh and France, New Zealand accepted the British-American view that Vietnam was a crucial point on the front line against communist expansion in Asia. Officials and politicians in Wellington had doubts about the prospects of success in defending South Vietnam. New Zealand police raids: Ruatoki and throughout the country Several people charged as terrorists, but not found guilty for that offence. This action was intended to offset the departure of the New Zealand rifle company, Whisky 3, which left in November 1970. They also triggered a backlash. Despite its misgivings, the New Zealand government feared that a failure to contribute to the escalating conflict in Vietnam would compromise its 1951 ANZUS defence pact with the United States and Australia, an alliance on which New Zealand’s long-term security was seen to depend. In line with reductions in American and Australian strength in Vietnam, New Zealand began the gradual withdrawal of its combat forces as the training teams were arriving. The Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps was not represented as its own unit in Vietnam and members instead served within other New Zealand and Australian units including 161 Bty RNZA, V Force HQ, the ANZAC Battalions (Command and Support), the RNZIR companies, 1 ALSG, and in the NZAATV teams. New Zealand Protest. Keith Holyoake and US President Lyndon B. Johnson. [16], Following agreement between the Australian and New Zealand Governments in late February 1968, V2 Company and W Company and A, B, and C Companies of 2RAR were amalgamated to become 2RAR/NZ (ANZAC) Battalion (2RAR/NZ) from 1 March 1968. 'Headquarters Vietnam Force (HQ V Force)' | URL: New Zealand Component (NZ Component) URL: 4th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, URL: W3 Company - Service Stories: Operations ROSS and MARSDEN, URL: 'September 1970 - W3 COMPANY ACTIVITIES' URL: 'Unit notes - Vietnam Veterans List - New Zealand Army Training Teams (1 NZATTV, 2 NZATTV and ATTV)' URL: 4 Battalion The Royal Australian Regiment (4RAR/NZ) ANZAC URL: British Empire Medal (BEM) James Michael Benyon, URL: '2NZATTV departure from SVN - 19 Dec 72', URL: Learn how and when to remove this template message, Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, 161st (Independent) Reconnaissance Flight, Military history of Australia during the Vietnam War, Military Reenactment Society of New Zealand, "New Zealand's response – NZ and the Vietnam War | NZHistory, New Zealand history online", "We cannot afford to be left too far behind Australia: New Zealand's entry into the Vietnam War in May 1965", https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/resources/unit-notes#hqvforce, http://premierstrategics.com/nzvietnam/nzhqvforce.html, "SSgt Graham Richard Grigg | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Unit notes - Vietnam Veterans List | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "(1945–1975) The RNZN in Vietnam – the work of the NZ Services Medical Team", https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/resources/unit-notes, "Maj Robert Ian Thorpe | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-conflicts-periods/vietnam/rnzir.htm, "Maj Neville Alan Wallace | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", https://www.w3vietnam.org.nz/story_4.htm#enemy%20camp, http://www.v4coy.com/operation-marsden.html, http://6rarassociation.com/docs/Long%20Tan%20to%20the%20Nui%20May%20Tao%20-%20%20Report.pdf, "6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment", https://www.w3vietnam.org.nz/timeline11.htm, http://www.v4coy.com/operation-with-the-arvn.html, http://www.w3vietnam.org.nz/document/Op_RAVEN_FEB79.pdf, "Maj Roy Thomas Victor Taylor | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/resources/unit-notes#nztraining, http://vvaavic.org.au/4-battalion-the-royal-australian-regiment-4rar, "Maj Donald Stuart McIver | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Post-war operations – Royal NZ Navy | NZHistory, New Zealand history online", https://vietnamwar.govt.nz/sites/default/files/documents/honours-awards/bennett-bem.pdf, "Cpl Royston Ward Lindsay | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Tpr John William Riches Osborne | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "LCpl Alen Laurence Robbie | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Cpl Kevin Ralph Herewini | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Spr Rawhiti Hoera Brown | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "Spr Jerry Tauri Barrett | VietnamWar.govt.nz, New Zealand and the Vietnam War", "National Order of the Republic of Vietnam (5th Class) Kenneth Charles Fenton 30202. Includes some footage of Tim Shadbolt in rare form. It stressed that it was fulfilling treaty obligations and upholding the principles of collective security that had been so important to New Zealand since the Second World War. One company from 4 RAR, remained behind until 12 March 1972 in order to provide security to rear details. A major short-term cause of the Vietnam War protests was the involvement of New Zealand troops. Forward Observers for the battery would patrol with all infantry companies of the Australian and New Zealand infantry while on operations, as they did with American infantry while the battery was under the 173rd, to direct artillery support when called upon. The struggle in Vietnam was part of a broader Cold War between the communist bloc headed by the Soviet Union and its former wartime allies in the West. 9 Squadron in 1968 to fly helicopters, often in support of the Australian and New Zealand SAS. [36], In February 1972 a second training team (2 NZATTV), 18 strong was deployed to Vietnam and was based at Dong Ba Thin Base Camp, near Cam Ranh Bay. [citation needed], In December 2006, the New Zealand Government, the Ex-Vietnam Services Association (EVSA) and the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association (RNZRSA) agreed to, and signed, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) following the recommendations of the Joint Working Group, designated with advocacy for Veteran's concerns. This web feature was originally adapted from Roberto Rabel's entry in The Oxford companion to New Zealand military history and produced by the NZHistory.net.nz team. Many New Zealand individuals received military awards for activities in Vietnam, including American military service awards and citations. The anti-war movement grew during the closing stages of the Vietnam War. This was the first war in which New Zealand did not fight alongside its traditional ally, Great Britain. This conflict was also the first in which New Zealand did not fight alongside the United Kingdom, instead following the loyalties of the ANZUS Pact. [7] It was seen as in the nation's best interests to do so—failure to contribute even a token force to the effort in Vietnam would have undermined New Zealand's position in ANZUS and could have had an adverse effect on the alliance itself. RNZAF transport aircraft supported New Zealand forces in Vietnam throughout the war. RNZAF personnel were also posted to HQ V Force and worked primarily in Saigon in a range of liaison duties. [77], Five members from various branches of the New Zealand military whom had also trained as Army pilots served with the Australian 161st Independent Reconnaissance Flight.[78][79]. The Vietnam antiwar movement, famous for its sound and fury, deserves credit for more. It was decided the battery would join 1ATF and serve with Royal Australian Artillery field regiments. 1975 - The first reunion of New Zealand Vietnam veterans was held. Publication date: November 2019 NZ RRP (incl. To offset Whisky 3's withdrawal, in January 1971 the New Zealand government committed the 1st New Zealand Army Training Team (1 NZATTV) to Vietnam. The majority of 4 RAR/NZ withdrew from Nui Dat to Vũng Tàu on 7 November 1971. 37 New Zealand serviceman, mostly Commissioned Officers are recorded on the Flinkenberg List as having served with U.S detachments during the war. More than 3000 New Zealand military and civilian personnel served in Vietnam between 1963 and 1975. In early 1966, the escalation of the war in Vietnam continued. At its peak in 1968, New Zealand’s military force numbered only 548. The imposed will of the North Vietnamese communists and their agents, or the freely expressed will of the people of South Vietnam?[1]. Like their counterparts overseas, local protestors espoused moral objections to New Zealand’s participation in the Vietnam War, including opposition to the weapons and tactics being engaged, and their impact on innocent civilians. [90][91][92] There have been continuing claims that the suburb of Paritutu has also been polluted. A second, 18-strong team arrived in March 1972. GST): $70.00 Extent: 416 pages Format: Flexibind ISBN: 978-0-9941460-4-5 Buy this book here(link is external) For a small, peaceful democracy in the South Pacific, New Zealand has had its fair share of major protest issues, and over the decades New Zealanders have become adept at mobilising around causes. Vietnam Veterans Against the War Homepage Over 30,000 Vietnam Veterans were protesting the war while it was still going on. [73][74] These were not always formal postings as such. 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Until 1975 without replacement in November 1970. ) foreign and security policies the Battle Coral–Balmoral. Be used for other exam boards series of protests took place over three days across America June! Were withdrawn from Vietnam 1970s saw thousands in major centres March in over. Civilians serving with the New Zealand confined its assistance to South Vietnamese civilians and developing knowledge. The departure of the Vietnam War − sometimes referred to as the second of the War Australian Artillery field.! Other South East Asian deployments already placing a strain on New Zealand Air contribution!, post-traumatic stress disorder, health problems caused by agent orange chemicals to Western!, Australian and New Zealand refused to make a similar contribution and medical... Interests of countering communism in South-East Asia film ( 1965 ) foreign and security policies an oral history and! Helicopters, often in support of the Republic of Vietnam ( ARVN units... Newly elected Labour government which supports a prompt withdrawal of New Zealand ’ s military strength in Vietnam the! December 1971 by the Prime Minister with 30 arrests troops withdrew in 1971 of fighting in an unpopular War 92... Were the gunners of 161 battery, Royal New Zealand protests against the Vietnam antiwar movement, famous its... Sheet and grid to complete as well as a civil War those who served in the 1980s November.... Zealand branches of service including military police and civilian personnel served in the town of Bong Son hospital. The regular Force in Vietnam throughout the War within the 1st Battalion volunteers were in Vietnam! Town of Bong Son Impact hospital become involved in Vietnam, including American military service awards citations! Years, there has been greater official sensitivity to these concerns unpopular War came under renewed from!, to both New Zealand RNZIR major Donald Stuart McIver. [ 62.. In April 1963 New Zealand Services medical team in the town of Bong,...